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Author Topic: Montgomery County  (Read 208 times)

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Offline Guidedawg

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Re: Montgomery County
« Reply #30 on: September 05, 2017, 11:44:20 AM »
64. The William Lowndes Yancey Law Office is located at the corner of Washington and Perry Streets in Montgomery, Alabama. It served as the law offices for one of the South's leading advocates of secession from the United States, William Lowndes Yancey, from 1846 until his death in 1863. He joined with John A. Elmore to form a legal firm after his resignation from Congress on 1 September 1846. Yancey wrote Alabama's Ordinance of Secession after the election of Abraham Lincoln and subsequently served as the Confederacy's Commissioner to England and France.

The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. It was also declared a National Historic Landmark on 7 November 1973. The building's interior included the historic floor plan and other decorative details when it was declared a landmark. The late 1970s brought redevelopment of the site and the building was altered, this caused substantial losses to enough of the historic elements that the landmark designation was withdrawn on 5 March 1986. The building remains on the National Register of Historic Places, however.

As a lawyer, populist legislator, firebrand orator, and party leader, William Lowndes Yancey was an important figure in sectional politics in the leadup to the Civil War. As one of the leading Southern Fire-Eaters, he gained national influence as an aggressive advocate of Slavery and States' Rights and exacerbated sectional differences that led to the secession of the Southern states from the Union. He had his law office in this building from 1846 until his death in 1863. Through successive modernizations and restorations in the 1970s and 1980s, the building lost much of the historic integrity for which it was originally designated a landmark, leading to the withdrawal of its designation. It was, however, retained on the National Register of Historic Places.










Offline Guidedawg

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Re: Montgomery County
« Reply #31 on: September 05, 2017, 04:02:15 PM »
34. The Montgomery VA office on Perry Hill Road does have some older structures near the back, but is listed because of being managed by the National service. 

I have only taken a photo of the main entrance.




Offline Guidedawg

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Re: Montgomery County
« Reply #32 on: September 05, 2017, 04:03:51 PM »
48. The house was built in the early 1850s for Samuel Farrow Rice, who served as a member of the Alabama House of Representatives and the Alabama Senate, and later as Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court.

In the late 1860s, the house was purchased by Henry Churchill Semple, a veteran of the Confederate States Army. The house remained in the Semple family until 1924. It was later acquired by John Haardt, a realtor, and used as offices.

By 1970, it was purchased by the state of Alabama






It is the current headquarters of the Alabama Historical Commission and I recognized it immediately from the back cover of the Alabama History textbook we have at home.

Offline Guidedawg

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Re: Montgomery County
« Reply #33 on: September 05, 2017, 04:05:57 PM »
54. The Steiner-Lobman and Teague Hardware Buildings are historic buildings in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.. They were built by businessmen Louis Steiner and Nathan Lobman circa 1891 for their hardware store. By 1895, the Southern building was sold to William Martin Teague, the owner of the Teague Hardware Company. The buildings remained in the respective families as late as the 1970s. They have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since January 31, 1979



I have heard some say the original owner is buried in the “coffin” on the roof.  Who can tell me the purpose of the actual structure?



Offline Guidedawg

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Re: Montgomery County
« Reply #34 on: September 05, 2017, 04:09:31 PM »
57.  The Dr. C.A. Thigpen House is a historic mansion in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.. It was built for Dr. Charles A. Thigpen, a physician, circa 1898. It was designed in the classical style by architect Frank Lockwood. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since December 13, 1977.





Offline Guidedawg

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Re: Montgomery County
« Reply #35 on: September 05, 2017, 04:16:45 PM »
3. The Bell Building is an office building located in downtown Montgomery, Alabama. It was built in 1907 by local businessman Newton J. Bell, and was the tallest building in Montgomery at the time. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. The height of the building is 187 feet.




Offline Guidedawg

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Re: Montgomery County
« Reply #36 on: September 05, 2017, 04:35:21 PM »
46. The Sayre Street School building is located at 506 Sayre Street, in an older residential neighborhood near downtown Montgomery, Alabama. The school was originally built in 1891 by builder J. B. Worthington and today serves as office space. On February 19, 1982 the building was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.



Another one that appears to be sadly deteriorating.