Topic: Deadly mistakes  (Read 361 times)

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Offline Chitza

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« on: May 13, 2017, 07:00:45 AM »
None of this info is new to me but it did give me insight as to why I find myself struggling to keep up when riding with a group. Go ahead and skip the first minute of talking head, unless you want to hear a schpill about being a Patreon.



#2. Following distance: I get separated from a group for this reason. I find when I'm following too close, I feel like I'm letting the rider ahead of me make decisions based on their skill level. I fall a little further back than the recommended 3 seconds so the decisions are mine based on my typically lower skill level. Also, I'm not aggressive on take off from a stop, increasing my following distance even further. Of course both of these practices present different safety challenges for me. Getting separated from the group and riding faster than my comfort level to catch up. Conundrum.
Loud pipes make me hungry for Valium biscuits and scotch gravy. - kdtrull

Yeah....ham it up, crackers.   ;D -kdtrull
The politically correct term is "Saltine American". -KevinB

Offline Chitza

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« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2017, 07:06:19 AM »
I forgot to mention, when riding with a group, I don't like being followed too closely by a rider, especially when I don't know them or their skill level. So I will fall to the back of the group and with my other practices and lack of power, I struggle more to catch up/keep up. I usually let the ride leader know how I roll so they are aware that I will likely be the one they are waiting on at the turns :)
Loud pipes make me hungry for Valium biscuits and scotch gravy. - kdtrull

Yeah....ham it up, crackers.   ;D -kdtrull
The politically correct term is "Saltine American". -KevinB

Offline jrobinson

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« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2017, 07:34:13 AM »
Waiting on a rider at the turns is 100 better than backtracking to find the rider and bike off in a ditch.

I read an article a long timer ago about Race Lines vs. Life Lines.

Race lines should be reserved for race tracks. A race line uses all the traction and road/track that's available. There's no room for error.

Life lines uses most of the traction and road. If you make a mistake you have room for recovery and hopefully save your life.

I agree with his first rule. Doesn't matter if you're right or wrong if you're dead. Dead Right is still dead.

One rule he left out that is at the top of my list, "Always have a ditch picked out". This is a plan "B" if things go wrong. I'm constantly looking for an alternative path that will be less painful than the one that may pop up in front of me.

Offline Gam

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« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2017, 09:13:29 PM »
Well my answer is to not ride in groups  :). I ride with about  3 people, I know how they ride and they know how I ride.  They know if the road is twisty I will not attempt to keep up I am going to ride at my happy speed,  I don't do "spirited".  Usually we know where we are headed and just say I will see you in Tellico or whatever.